GPX files

NOTES: 

- THE FOLLOWING GPX FILES DO NOT INCLUDE A TEMPORARY DETOUR DUE TO ROAD WORKS CLOSING THE AQUADUCT OVER THE SEINE UNTIL SEPTEMBER 2018: SEE SHEETS 10 AND 10A OF MY PRINTED INSTRUCTIONS 

- THE GPX FILES ALSO USE THE PREVIOUS, SLIGHTLY LONGER VERSION OF THE ROUTE BETWEEN GOURNAY AND ST GERMER: TO USE DISUSED RAILWAY TO CUT OUT A HILL AND A COUPLE OF MILES, EITHER LOOK AT SHEET 4 OF MY PRINTED INSTRUCTIONS OR SIMPLY FOLLOW THE YELLOW AVENUE VERTE SIGNS (THE "OFFICIAL ROUTE") BETWEEN GOURNAY AND ST GERMER.


This file is a plot kindly made on Riding with GPS by Marcus Atkinson in 2017. He says it can  easily be used to make a GPX/TCX file

Peter Kidd has made these files into a published "my places" map. He did this in order to be able to download the route onto his tablet and use even without being continuously online. Here is what he found:

"Although one cannot get access to 'My places" maps without an internet connection, I realised that if you load such a map onto a mobile device while one does have an internet connection (e.g before setting off from home), and then switch to Flight/Aeroplane mode, the loaded map and route remain accessible. So, for someone like me, who has a Google Nexus 7 but no smartphone, it's possible to carry your electronic route map as well as the printed-out paper instructions."

In addition:

Martin Collett, a rider who did this route fast on a road bike in 2011,  constructed  accurate GPX files of the route.


Open this zipped file and you can either download four separate GPX files (see Martin's note below) or a single file if your GPS can handle a large one.. 

I'm told they work with Viewranger, a useful mapping app.

Martin says:

"These four  GPX files (my GPS is a few years old and can't store the entire journey as a single route, having a limit of 250 points per route) have a few 'proximity waypoints' at critical points (leaving on slip roads, the turning into the first forest) which makes a box pop up on the GPS so I don't miss the turn"

Martin also says that it also helped to read the route guide notes first, especially for the forest sections, just to get a sense of orientation.


 Peter Kidd has made these files into a published "my places" map. He did this in order to be able to download the route onto his tablet and use even without being continuously online. Here is what he found:

"Although one cannot get access to 'My places" maps without an internet connection, I realised that if you load such a map onto a mobile device while one does have an internet connection (e.g before setting off from home), and then switch to Flight/Aeroplane mode, the loaded map and route remain accessible. So, for someone like me, who has a Google Nexus 7 but no smartphone, it's possible to carry your electronic route map as well as the printed-out paper instructions."